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Live Streams of Downtown Asheville, NC

North Asheville, South Asheville, East Asheville, & West Asheville. From the top of downtown Asheville's tallest building, the centrally located BB&T Building, Wilcox World Travel and Tours brings you real-time, live streams of Pack Square, The Grove Park Inn, Westgate Bridge, The Asheville Tourists, Local Traffic, Pisgah Mountain and much more.

MerleFest 2014

MerleFest2014MerleFest, considered one of the premier music festivals in the country, is an annual homecoming of musicians and music fans held on the campus of Wilkes Community College in Wilkesboro, North Carolina. MerleFest was founded in 1988 in memory of the late Eddy Merle Watson, son of the late American music legend Doc Watson. MerleFest is a celebration of “traditional plus” music, a unique mix of music based on the traditional, roots-oriented sounds of the Appalachian region, including bluegrass and old-time music, and expanded to include Americana, country, blues, rock and many other styles. The festival hosts over 130 artists, performing on 13 stages during the course of the four-day event. The annual event has become the primary fundraiser for the WCC Endowment Corporation, funding scholarships, capital projects and other educational needs.

Ticket Info and Prices


Which Ticket Should I Buy?

A reserved seat ticket ensures the ticket holder will receive a reserved chair in front of the Watson and Cabin Stages. Chairs are provided at most of the other stages and are available on a first-come first-served basis or you may bring your own chairs or blankets.

A general admission ticket is a great choice for festival goers who prefer lawn seating and plan to bring their own chairs and blankets. Chairs and blankets must be removed each night. You may take them with you or store them in our convenient overnight storage at no charge. General admission pass holders may use unoccupied reserved seats before 5 p.m. or until owner returns.

 

Tickets  Early Bird Thru 3/10/2014 Beginning 3/11/2014
4-Day Reserved Seating at the
Watson Stage (Limited) 
$235 row 1 – 35 $260
$210 row 36 – 49 $235
4-Day Pass General Admission $150 $165
Fri/Sat/Sun General Admission $135  $145
Single Day General Admission
Thursday Gates Open 2:30 p.m. $ 40 $ 40
Friday Gates Open 9:00 a.m. $ 55 $ 55
Saturday Gates Open 9:00 a.m. $ 60 $ 60
Sunday Gates Open 9:00 a.m. $ 45 $ 45
Midnight Jam (Limited) $ 40 Can be purchased with a 3-Day, 
4-Day, or Saturday entrance pass only

 

4-Day web/phone orders only 

On Campus RV (Limited Availability)includes one vehicle pass. 
RV Rules and Regulations  

$450 $450

Flattop’s Parking (Limited Availability) 
(located next to Sagebrush on Collegiate Drive)

$95 $95

Pre-Paid Parking (Limited Availability)  

$140 $140

Primitive Tent Camping at Rivers Edge 
Operated by Wilkes County Recreation Department (drugs, alcohol, animals prohibited)
1 tent/1 vehicle per site – limit 450 primitive sites (1-Day Camping available on site)

Campsite up to 4 persons

$ 75 $75

For limited (self-contained) RV camping at Rivers Edge call Wilkes County Recreation Department at (336) 651-7352 

 
 Can only be purchased with 4-Day Festival Pass
†† Can only be purchased with 3 or 4 Day Festival Pass 

Handicap Parking: All public parking for persons with a disability and appropriate state-issued handicap parking credentials will be located at Shuttle Stop H in the Blue Lot. MerleFest has designated the entire north paved area for handicapped parking only and has designated shuttles for this area that include wheelchair accessible vans to transport guests to the main festival entrance (turn right at the end of Stokes Street onto Industrial Drive). ADA Contact 

Refunds/Exchanges will only be issued if postmarked by February 1, 2014.
Return by mail to: PO Box 120, Wilkesboro, NC 28697-0120

Tickets purchased after April 15th will be held @ Will Call unless customers choose the print@home option.

NOTE: Children 12 and under are admitted FREE to general admission seating areas (accompanied by a paying adult);
however, tickets are required for all seats in the reserved seating area.

Blue Ridge Wine and Food Festival


BlowingRock


Hiker Haze in the Smokies


HikerHaze
Attention AT hikers and weekend trail adventurers: Whether you’re coming in off the trail for a couple of “Zero Days” or visiting the Smokies for a weekend in the forest, plan on being at Fontana Village Resort for its second annual Hiker Haze event. There will be plenty of fun and entertainment scheduled. Check out our website for the complete schedule of events.

HikerHaze2

Photos trace history of Asheville’s Southside

Asheville South Side 1960'sA note attached to one photo of a home calls it an “illegal gambling/whiskey house,” or illegal bar.

“We really have to get beyond the nostalgia to say what was there, what was life really like,” Mathews said.

Interconnected

Many, many more structures in Southside housed legitimate businesses.

“Many people who grew up here remember (Southside) and being as vital, if not more vital, a commercial district than The Block,” Mathews said, referring to the historic African-American business district around the intersection of Eagle and South Market streets near City Hall.

Mathews shows photo after photo of Southside auto repair shops, restaurants, service stations, beauty parlors and hotels, including one where James Brown and Aretha Franklin once played in an upstairs auditorium.

Some homes were small, but many had distinctive architectural features people would treasure today.

“The preservationist in me is saying I could have done something with these buildings,” Mathews says.

And while a family’s home might — or might not — have been humble, it might have also been three doors down from an aunt, a block away from a grandfather or next door to a neighbor who would keep an eye on the kids.

In urban renewal, “A lot of the webs of interconnection that kept those families together were removed,” Mathews said.

He says those in charge of urban renewal did not do a good job of deciding what should be saved and what should not, did not do enough to help people with the transition to new homes and gave Southside residents little say in the whole process.

Many people who were told they would be able to build new homes on cheap Southside lots could not get financing or found other obstacles, Ndiaye said.

There were “a lot of hurt people, a feeling of being injured,” she said. “They were told that something would happen, and it didn’t.”

Some observers, Mathews said, see what happened to the people of Southside as a continuation of Jim Crow laws from the 19th century.

Asheville Southside 1930'sMany changes to Southside cannot be reversed. Ndiaye said she hopes, though, that remembering its history can help heal wounds.

“I’m just happy to know that this conversation is going on, that we are acknowledging the fact that certain things happened in this city and it impacted people,” she said.

Biltmore again tops NC tourism list




North Carolina

— The Biltmore House in Asheville was again the most-visited attraction in North Carolina in 2013, according to Matthews-based Carolina Publishing Associates.

<a href='http://www.ashevillelivecam.com/link/BiltmoreEstate'><p class=Biltmore Estate, 1890–1895, Asheville, North C…” title=”Biltmore Estate, 1890–1895, Asheville, North C…” class=”zemanta-img-inserted zemanta-img-configured” width=”350″ height=”121″ /> Biltmore Estate, 1890–1895, Asheville, North Carolina, Richard Morris Hunt, architect (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The former estate of the wealthy Vanderbilt family drew more than 1.2 million visitors for the year. The North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences in Raleigh also topped the million-visitor mark and the North Carolina Zoo in Asheboro had a respectable 739,943 guests.

The Triangle claims seven of the top 30 most-visited attractions in the state.

Most-visited museums and attractions, 2013 

1. Biltmore, Asheville, 1,210,138.

2. NC Museum of Natural Sciences, Raleigh, 1,026,177.

3. North Carolina Zoo, Asheboro, 739,943.

4. Fort Macon State Park, Atlantic Beach, 722,260.

5. Discovery Place, Charlotte, 705,845.

6. Marbles Kids Museum, Raleigh. 648,450.

7. Fort Fisher State Historic Site, Kure Beach. 614,158.

8.Wright Brothers National Memorial, Kill Devil Hills, 489,123.

9. NC Aquarium at Fort Fisher, Kure Beach, 447,892.

10. Museum of Life and Science, Durham, 421,095.

11. NC Aquarium at Pine Knoll Shores, 389, 612.

12. Jennette’s Pier, Nags Head, 308,786.

13. North Carolina Arboretum, Asheville. 332,748.

14. Greensboro Science Center, 325,536.

15. NC Maritime Museums (Beaufort, Graveyard of the Atlantic Museum, Hatteras, NC Maritime Museum at Southport), 325,921.

16. NC Museum of History, Raleigh. 288,800.

17. North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh, 287,605.

18. NC Aquarium at Roanoke Island, Manteo, 275,141.

19. Fort Raleigh National Historic Park, Manteo, 264,942.

20. Grandfather Mountain, Linville, 314,127.

21. Battleship North Carolina, Wilmington, 211,724

22. Chimney Rock State Park, Chimney Rock. 194,073.

23. Duke University Chapel, Durham, 182,215.

24. Tryon Palace, New Bern 181,350.

25. NASCAR Hall of Fame, Charlotte, 173,024.

26. Linville Caverns, Marion, 170,689.

27. Old Salem Museums Gardens, Winston-Salem, 146,900.

28. Cherokee Cultural Attractions, Cherokee, 145,778.

29. Morehead Planetarium, Chapel Hill, NC 142,135.

30. Mint Museums, Charlotte, 142,057.
 


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WilsonMcGuire carves out niche marketing golf, tourism



WilsonMcGuire Creative in Winston-Salem has carved out a name for itself promoting golf events, including the PGATour's Wyndham Championship.

WilsonMcGuire Creative in Winston-Salem has carved out a name for itself promoting golf events, including the PGATour’s Wyndham Championship.


Owen Covington Reporter- The Business Journal Email  | Twitter  | Google+  | LinkedIn

Skyline of Winston-Salem, North Carolina. The ...

Skyline of Winston-Salem, North Carolina. The prominent building on the left is the BB&T Financial tower; the tallest building, on the right, is the Wachovia Center. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

When Gov. Pat McCrory earlier this month pronounced his dedication to making golf big business in North Carolina, it was welcome news to LeAnn Wilson McGuire.

It’s not that she’s an avid golfer — she only really took up learning the game last year. But as an advertising executive, she’s carved out a niche for her Winston-Salem agency, WilsonMcGuire Creative, as a go-to firm for golf.

“I was super-excited to hear him say that,” Wilson McGuire told The Business Journal.

WilsonMcGuire was tapped as agency of record for the 2014 U.S. Open and U.S. Women’s Open, with both to be held this year in Pinehurst.

Her agency is running full bore in promoting the event by overseeing its web presence, online and print advertising, ticket design and a wide range of advertising services for the event. The events run back-to-back June 12 through June 22.

Pinehurst Hedge

Pinehurst Hedge (Photo credit: deltaMike)

It was Wilson McGuire’s relationship with Pinehurst Resort, cultivated years ago, that led to this year’s U.S. Open work.

She began working with the resort while a partner at The Burris Agency in Greensboro, and after leaving the firm in 2003 to set out on her own, the resort was one of her first clients.

“I grew up on a golf course, so I understand the sport 100 percent,” she said.

The first work for the U.S. Women’s Open came for the 2007 event, generated by relationships she’d developed through her work for Pinehurst. The following year, the agency was selected to design the tickets for the U.S. Open at Torrey Pines.

And the work has continued to grow, primarily through relationships and word of mouth. She now has a list of past and present clients that includes the Carolinas Golf Association, the U.S. Golf Association, the former Pinehurst Championship Management and the Wyndham Championship.


Owen Covington covers health care, insurance, law/bankruptcy court, media/advertising, local government and sports business.



Waiving the fee for Entrance to the Black Mountain College Museum and Arts Center

“As an institution that adds to and thrives within Asheville’s amazing cultural offerings, we thought that a proper celebration of our 20 years as a museum and the 80 year anniversary of the opening of Black Mountain College would include free admission to our unique exhibits,” said Board Chair Dr. Brian Butler in a press release issued Sunday afternoon. “We think of this as both a thank you to our community and as a gentle invite to anyone who has not already stopped in to learn about our exhibitions and events.”

alice sebrell, of black mountain college museu...

alice sebrell, of black mountain college museum and arts center, shows me (and siena!) mary parks washington’s histcollage titled “black mountain college” (Photo credit: davidsilver)

The move grants all visitors free access to ongoing exhibitions in the museum’s Broadway Street gallery space. Some special events, such as lectures, film screening and poetry readings, among other programs, may still have one-time ticket fees. As for the financial difference, the board’s goal, according to Alice Sebrell, BMCM+AC’s program director, is to balance out potential loss in admission revenues with further grant writing, fundraising and in-kind donations from increased attendance.

“We’ve always been free to members and always free on every single Wednesday of the month,” Sebrell told Xpress. By offering free admission the museum can reach a larger audience, particularly in the arts-based tourism sector. “It’s a positive move towards total inclusion,” she says.

“In this town, with so many people working on low wages, especially in the artists community, it’s nice to offer this,” Sebrell says. We’ve always kept that on the forefront of our minds.” And now, she says, “with free consciouses, we can welcome everyone in through our doors.”

Black Mountain College Museum + Arts Center is located at 56 Broadway Street in downtown Asheville. The gallery is open to the public from 12 to 4 p.m. on Tuesday and Wednesday and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Thursday, Friday and Saturday. The current exhibition, Cynthia Homire: Vision Quest, which features ceramic works, drawings and poems by the New Mexico-based artist and former BMC student, is on view through May 17.

Black Mountain College

Black Mountain College (Photo credit: Wikipedia)